How To Make Peach Blossom Flowers

Here these delicate peachy florals have been used on a modern grey and metallic cake, but they would make a romantic addition to any of your cake creations! Tutorial by Natalie Porter.

Image credit: How To Make Peachy Blossoms

Here these delicate peachy florals have been used on a modern grey and metallic cake, but they would make a romantic addition to any of your cake creations! Tutorial by Natalie Porter.

You will need:

Edibles:

Equipment:

  • 120g pale peach flower paste
  • royal icing
  • petal dusts: copper, peach, orange, and pink
  • a range of blossom and flower shapes e.g. Blossom Sugar Art hydrangea and mould, multi hydrangea and mulit petunia set, and plunger blossom cutters
  • basic modelling tools
  • ball tool
  • firm foam pad
  • two small five petal cutters in consecutive sizes
  • bobble foam to dry flowers on
  • soft paint brushes for the petal dusts
1

Gather your flower cutters. I have used nine different shapes, but the beauty of this design is you can do it with whatever cutters you have to hand.

2

Roll out the flowerpaste to a thickness of approximately 1-2mm. Cut out your shapes and press into the mould, giving the flower veins and details. Place onto bobble foam to dry.

3

Again roll out flowerpaste and cut the shapes, pressing into the mould. If you have a range of sizes available, make a variety of the different flowers. You will need quite a few to go all around the cake. Place onto bobble foam to dry.

4

With this particular mould, I find it useful to accentuate the separation of the petals with a tool as shown. Place onto bobble foam to dry.

5

With this small petunia shape I have not used a mould. Cut the shapes, place them onto a firm foam pad and use a ball tool to soften.

6

With the larger petunia cutter I have used the mould to give detail and veins to the flower.

7

Place the flowers onto a firm foam pad and use a ball tool to shape and soften the edge of the flower. Place onto bobble foam to dry.

8

Cut plenty of tiny blossoms with the plunger cutters. Place them on to the firm foam pad and use a ball
tool to press the centre and cup the flower.

9

Use the small five petal cutters, cutting the two sizes in pairs. Place them on to the firm foam pad and use a ball tool to soften the edges. Place onto bobble foam to dry.

10

Let the flowers dry on the bobble foam for at least a few hours, or if possible over night.

11

With a couple of clean soft brushes, decant a little of the petal dusts onto a piece of kitchen paper. I like to work on kitchen paper as you can wipe excess dust from your brush onto the paper, thus controlling the amount of colour you're applying.

12

For the hydrangea, start with some peach in the centre. Add a little tiny touch of orange, followed a tiny bit of pink. For variety, I made the colour a little darker on the smallest hydrangea and kept the bigger ones a bit paler.

13

The small petunia, blossoms and five petal shapes have just a little hint of peach in the centre. By mixing a little pink and orange with the peach dust you can make it slightly darker.

14

For the large petunias, add a little orange to the centre of the flower and a hint of pink to edge of the petals - just enough to give the flower some definition and outline.

15

Pipe little dots onto the centres of the flowers that don't have a centre. Paint all the centres copper with a small brush.

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